Restoring a Model T Ford Steering Column

The scene above is from the firewall assembly area of the Ford Highland Park Plant circa May 1915.  Towards the left side of the picture the steering columns, wrapped in brown paper, are installed in the firewall. The firewalls would be installed into the chassis fully assembled with coil box, steering column, speedometer, wiring and timer as a unit.

The Model T Ford steering column is a pretty important item that often gets neglected to the point that it is dangerous to drive the car. Particularly the earliest versions used from 1909 – 1914, which have the gear box riveted to the steering column upper bearing. Even the columns used from 11915 – 25, or the unique 1926 – 27 versions can become dangerous if the rivets come loose that secure the upper bearing to the tube.

In this edition of Model T Ford Fix we show how to overhaul a steering column both for safety’s sake and to improve its appearance to like new again.

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How to: Keep Your Model T Ford from Marking its Territory

A Model T Ford showroom in 1925 has oil stains all over the floor left by brand new Model T’s.

This issue of Model T Ford Fix will be the first of several installments dealing with ways to lessen the amount of oil leaking from your Model T. In this case I am working on a 1910 touring. The hogshead had multiple leaks from a number of typical spots. We are going to show one method to eliminate leaks from the pedal shafts in this article. We will show you how to make the tooling necessary for the job, as well as performing the modification to the hogshead itself. Let’s go!

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Rebuilding a Holley Model G Carburetor

The Holley Model G carburetor was used on millions of Model T Fords starting with the 1914 model year, around July 1913. The Holley G is a very simple, reliable carburetor. Ford used versions of this carburetor from 1914 model year until some time in 1920 with Holley as its primary supplier of carburetors, Kingston being a secondary supplier during those years.

We got this particular Holley G from a friend in a swap involving some unneeded parts, so let’s say that our investment here is quite low. This is the earliest type of Holley G and would have been used in 1914. It has a brass body, brass float bowl, cork float, and a lock screw on the throttle idle stop adjuster. Let’s take a look at what needs to be done to turn this tired old corroded carburetor into a more presentable, rebuilt carburetor.

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The Ruckstell Two Speed Axle Part 1

 

The Ruckstell Axle was one of the few Ford factory approved accessories for the Model T. Indeed, it is every bit as useful today as it was when introduced in the time just after WWI by Hall Scott. Without a doubt it is the single most useful accessory ever devised for the Model T Ford. Many books and magazine articles have been written about the Ruckstell Axle. No question the best of these books is the one written by Glen Chaffin of Corona, California. It is the “bible” of Ruckstell repair.

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