Installing and Tuning the Stromberg B No 3 Carburetor on your Model T Ford

This is one of those times the short cut didn’t save any time………
The original steel rings were used with a new set of copper glands on the Stromberg intake manifold.

When we left off the Stromberg B No 3 carburetor was rebuilt and ready for installation. The installation turned out to be easy. Tuning was another matter! Read on to see what we had to do to get a sweet running Model T again.

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Rebuilding the Stromberg B No 3 Carburetor for the Model T Ford

A 1916 Model T runabout has been converted to an early version of semi – tractor / trailer.

Alfred Stromberg made his first fortune manufacturing telephone equipment copied from expired Bell patents. Between 1893 and 1905 the Stromberg Carlson company became dominant in the Rochester and upper New York state area. Stromberg and his partner Carlson sold out, leaving both men extremely wealthy but bored.

Stromberg and his partner moved to Chicago, Illinois and purchased two companies. One eventually became Stromberg Office Products, a company mostly known for making time clocks. The other company was the John Goldberg carburetor company. The name was changed to Stromberg Motor Devices company, building carburetors designed by John Goldberg at first.

Image of a Stromberg B series carburetor from the 1909 book “Automobile Motors and Mechanism” written by Thomas Herbert Russell

This issue we will examine and rebuild one of the earliest aftermarket carburetors built for the Model T Ford, the Stromberg model B No 3 .

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Rebuilding the Kingston 5 Ball Carburetor for your Model T Ford

Kingston sold hundreds of thousands of five ball carburetors to all sorts of manufacturers. They were used on everything from tractors to motorcycles, boats, and stationary engines of all sizes. The carburetor in this illustration has a threaded inlet, so it is not for a Model T Ford.

The earliest Model T Fords used the Kingston 5 Ball Carburetor. By all accounts the performance was and is great with the Kingston 5 Ball.   A few Model T’s in 1909 also were produced using another type of carburetor made by Buffalo, but those carburetors are seldom seen today, and Ford did not use many.  The Kingston 5 Ball is a very simple and sturdy all brass / bronze design. The five balls provide a secondary, on – demand air supply for the carburetor. As engine speed increases the decreased air pressure above the balls causes them to lift off their seats as needed by engine demand. One, some, or all of the balls might lift depending on airflow. This makes the carburetor very efficient and helps to eliminate flat spots with various throttle openings. Read on and we will see how to rebuild this carburetor.

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Rebuilding the Holley NH Carburetor for your Model T Ford

The most common of all Model T carburetors is the Holley NH. It was first used in the 1920 model year, the primary carburetor supplied for all Model T Fords and TT fords. This advertisement shows the earliest version used by Ford which has a so – called “straight thru” venturi throat arrangement. It also uses the earlier style float bowl with side drain.
  

In this issue we will examine the simplest (and some say best) carburetor ever used on the Model T Ford. The Holley NH was introduced around 1916 as an accessory for the Model T, sold by Holley along with a special intake manifold. Eventually the NH replaced the earlier Holley Model G in regular production some time in 1920. Read on to see what a typical overhaul of one of these carburetors entails.

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Replacing the Exhaust Manifold Glands and Exhaust Pipe on your Model T Ford

In our most recent tech article we rebuilt the muffler. After the new muffler was in place we were able to enjoy a much quieter T driving experience. But now we could hear exhaust leaks under the hood. Clearly a more exhaustive examination was in order.  In this issue we will show how to make this common job easier and how to get great results every time.

A 3Z624 Ford Exhaust Nut wrench was used to remove the exhaust pipe from the manifold. If you own a Model T you need one of these. Reproductions are sold by all the Model T part vendors. There is no way to properly tighten a T exhaust nut without one.  
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