Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

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Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

Post by Auto Inn » 04 Aug 2017, 09:49

Here is a link to the article:
https://modeltfordfix.com/what-kind-of- ... el-t-ford/


Discuss the article here.
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David Coleman
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Re: Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

Post by David Coleman » 09 Aug 2017, 19:22

We are fortunate (in far northern MN) to have most gas stations offering premium, alcohol-free gas at good prices. Having seen detrimental effects of Eth-OH gas on snowmobiles, ATVs, outboard motors, etc. their use in the Model T seems appropriate. We always add a little Stabilize in the tank at the end of the season for remaining gas.
Grand Marais, MN (most of the time) and Detroit, MI
1923 Model T Touring. Previously 2 different 1926 Model T tudors

26troadster
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Re: Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

Post by 26troadster » 09 Aug 2017, 19:33

I have started using 100% gas and fuel stabilizer when my Ts are stored during the winter. I have had issues with Ethanol fuel messing up carbs when stored.

Flyingcollie
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Re: Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

Post by Flyingcollie » 10 Aug 2017, 15:26

Excellent article on gasoline ! Good information on "Ethyl" and leaded gasoline from its inception (1922) until its demise. There are those who bewail the disappearance of leaded gas, so far as Model Ts are concerned, they pre-date it, never needed it, never will.

The concept of leaded gasoline "lubricating" valves is misunderstood. The addition of tetraethyl lead initially produced undesirable residues, which required the addition of more chemistry . . . the result was that combustion produced lead halides, which would coat valve surfaces. This had a beneficial effect for engines laboring in under-powered situations for long periods in high heat, as the coating prevented microscopic "weld back" of exhaust valve mating surfaces, which would cause seat recession and failure otherwise. So, in a sense, leaded gas did "lubricate" valves in a manner which prolonged life.

Another interesting misconception is that ethanol reduces the "power" of gasoline, usually interpreted in terms of octane rating. I don't know, nor can say whether "gasohol" mixes are less "powerful" than straight gasoline in terms of energy delivered, but it is most interesting to note that so far as octane is a measure of a fuel's resistance to pre-ignite, or detonate, engines built for the track with compression ratios in excess of 11:1 run them on . . . alcohol, as the fuel will not detonate.

Another amusing perception of fuels in general, is the notion that "jet fuel" would have to be something wildly far and above test standards for gasoline run in conventional piston engines . . . it's really kerosene . . .

If I'm guilty of passing along false or incorrect information in this post, I would gladly welcome the factual corrections !!

drobnock
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Re: Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

Post by drobnock » 10 Aug 2017, 15:46

Correct me if I am wrong ---

Some time between 1915 and 1920 the quality of gasoline (petrol) changed. From the period literature - pre ethyl - gasoline - the by-product of kerosene production was a purer lighter gasoline. There was less kerosene in the gasoline. The period text describes it as going from a lighter gasoline to a heavier gasoline - more by-products of kerosene in the mix. Has any one found modified carburetors that were machined to accept the new gasoline blend? From a 1921 text there is a description of a modified Holley carburetor. This modification was accomplished by opening up the mixing tube from 13/16 inch to 23/32 inch. This machining was to allow the newer and heavier gasoline to mix with air better for better mileage and power.

I believe light gasoline is described as light naphtha.
http://www.collectioncare.org/MSDS/naphthamsds.pdf

I am skeptical that the E15 gasoline will affect the metal of a Model T carburetor, as most are cast iron or brass.

drobnock
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Re: Care and Feeding - What kind of Gas to use in my Model T Ford?

Post by drobnock » 18 Aug 2017, 11:38

This is a correction ---

From the original source - Automobile Engineering.Vol. 6. page 71. 1921. "Ford Construction and Repair."

Text Reads, "This mixing tube, figure 54, can be replaced with a tube 23/32 inch in diameter at the throat for proper mixing of present heavy fuels."

Illustration 54 shows the old size as 13/16 inches, with the new diameter of 23/32 inches.

So corrected -
"This modification was accomplished by opening up the mixing tube from 13/16 inch to 23/32 inch. This machining was to allow the newer and heavier gasoline to mix with air better for better mileage and power."

I could take responsibility for the error, but it is easier to state that it was the action of the computer's analogue for sequential numbers.

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